Posted tagged ‘Heart Health’

CoQ10 for Heart Health & More…

April 23, 2010

CoQ10

  • Supports Cardiovascular Health
  • Supports Healthy Heart Muscles
  • Promotes Cellular Energy
  • Aids in Healthy Dopamine Production
  • Supports Oral Health
  • People with heart failure have been found to have lower levels of CoQ10 in heart muscle cells. Double-blind research suggests that CoQ10 may reduce symptoms related to heart failure, such as shortness of breath, difficulty sleeping, and swelling. CoQ10 is thought to increase energy production in the heart muscle, increasing the strength of the pumping action. Several small trials have also found that CoQ10 may be helpful for certain types of cardiomyopathy.

    Lower levels of CoQ10 have also been observed in people with Parkinson’s disease. Preliminary research has found that increasing CoQ10 may increase levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is thought to be lowered in people with Parkinson’s disease. It has also been suggested that CoQ10 might protect brain cells from damage by free radicals.

    CoQ10 may also help in the treatment and prevention of certain types of gum disease. A small study looked at the topical application of CoQ10 to the periodontal pocket. Ten male periodontitis patients with 30 periodontal pockets were selected. During the first 3 weeks, the patients applied topical CoQ10. There was significant improvement in symptoms.

    Consult your doctor before trying CoQ10. CoQ10 is used in combination with standard treatment, not to replace it. CoQ10 may lower blood sugar levels, so people with diabetes should not use CoQ10 unless under a doctor’s supervision. CoQ10 may also lower blood pressure. The safety of Co q10 in pregnant or nursing women or children has not been established.

    This information has not been evaluated by the FDA. Our dietary supplements are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease or medical condition, they are not intended to replace professional medical advice or treatment, Individual results may vary.

    Click here for more information on CoQ10.

    Heart Disease Patients With Higher Omega-3 Fatty Acids Age Slower

    January 21, 2010

    Heart disease patients with the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood appear to age more slowly than those with the lowest blood levels, according to a new study.

    A new study may help explain why. ”We’ve shown an entirely new effect of omega-3 fatty acids, which may be able to slow down the biological aging process in patients with coronary heart disease,” says lead author Ramin Farzaneh-Far, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco.

    In a previous study, Farzaneh-Far and his colleagues looked at a marker of biological age (the rate of shortening of telomeres) structures at the end of a chromosome involved in its replication and stability. As the telomeres shorten over time, the eventual result is cell death, the scientists believe.

    Farzaneh-Far says and his team looked at the same group of heart disease patients and found that telomere length was ”a powerful predictor of death and bad outcomes from heart disease. In that study, we found the shorter your telomeres, the greater your risk of death.”

    In the new study, the higher that the blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the patients evaluated, the slower the rate of telomere shortening.

    “We looked at the biological effects of higher blood levels,” Farzaneh-Far tells WebMD, “not supplement intake.”

    The study is published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    Omega-3s and Aging Study Details

    For the study, the researchers evaluated 608 patients with stable heart disease, recruited from the Heart and Soul Study from September 2000 and December 2002, following them up for a median of six years (half were followed more, half less).

    Participants gave blood samples at the beginning of the study, which were evaluated for omega-3 fatty acid levels. The researchers also isolated DNA from the blood and evaluated the length of the telomere of the leukocyte, a type of blood cell.

    Over the follow-up period, “patients with the lowest blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids exhibited a rate of telomere shortening 2.6 times faster than patients with the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids,” Farzaneh-Far tells WebMD.

    How does that relate to aging? “We don’t have enough data to be able to convert the changes of telomere shortening into years of aging,” he says. “This may be one of the first studies to look at the change in telomere length over time.”

    There was no association found between omega-3 fatty acid levels and telomere length at the study start. The researchers aren’t sure why, but state that omega-3 fatty acid levels is one of many influences on the length of the telomeres, with other factors including inflammation in the body, obesity, oxidative stress, and lack of physical activity. 

    Would high omega-3 blood levels help those without heart disease? Farzaneh-Far can’t say. ”Whether this effect of omega-3 fatty acids on telomere length is present in those without coronary heart disease, I just can’t say,” Farzaneh-Far says, noting it was beyond the scope of the study. However, he adds, ”it could be.” Telomere shortening occurs in everyone, he says 

    Omega-3 Fatty Acids & Aging: Other Opinions

    ”This is very exciting news, to show how fish oil works on a cellular level,” says Ravi Dave, MD, a cardiologist at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center & Orthopaedic Hospital and an associate professor of medicine at the University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine.

    The new finding, he says, builds on previous research. “There has been a strong association found that if you take marine omega-3 fatty acids, it reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease.”

    Researchers have been trying to pin down why. Several proposed mechanisms have been found, including reduction of inflammation in the body or reducing the risk of abnormal heart rhythms, Dave says.

    With the new finding, he says, “it’s no longer a hypothesized mechanism. It has some basis behind how it works.”

    But, he adds, “fish oils are only one of the things that affect telomere length.” Many other factors, he says, such as oxidative stress on the cells, play a role.

    Eventually, Dave says, if the telomere research bears out, a test to check a person’s telomere length may be one way to predict the risk of heart disease.

    The new research demonstrates a protective effect of fish oil on the aging clock, adds Robert Zee, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of molecular epidemiology at the division of preventive medicine of Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston. He has reported a link between shorter telomere length and heart attacks. But the new findings need replication, he says.

    Omega-3s and Health: Advice

    What should healthy people and those with heart disease do in terms of omega-3s?

    Farzaneh-Far points to the existing American Heart Association guidelines. “The American Heart Association already recommends at least a gram a day” of omega-3 fatty acid intake for those with documented heart disease, he says. Preferably it should come from oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, or albacore tuna, according to the AHA, but supplements could be considered if a patient’s doctor agrees.

    For those who don’t have heart disease, the AHA recommends eating a variety of fish, preferably oily types such as salmon, at least twice a week, and including in the diet healthy oils such as flaxseed, canola, and soybean.

    One of the researchers, William S. Harris of the University of South Dakota, reports receiving research grants from companies with interests in omega-3 fatty acids. Another co-author, Elizabeth H. Blackburn, PhD, shared the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase.

     By Kathleen Doheny – WebMD Health News

     

    Click here for more information on Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Natural Vitamin E for Heart Health

    November 17, 2009

    Are you taking the right vitamin E for your heart?

    Most people don’t know this, but there are eight forms of vitamin E:
    four tocopherols and four tocotrienols.

    While they’re all antioxidants, the differences between them could easily fill a book. But the most important is that tocotrienols – not tocopherols – have powerful heart benefits.

    Tocotrienols help:
    Reduce cholesterol oxidation
    Maintain healthy triglyceride levels
    Support normal blood pressure levels

    Tocotrienols have a shorter “tail” that can penetrate the fatty outer layer of a cell membrane and “attack” a cholesterol-creating enzyme called HMG-CoA helping to reduce cholesterol oxidation and helping to promote normal cholesterol levels.

    The problem with synthetic versions of vitamin E – the kind you find often in supplements – is that they contain none of the heart healthy tocotrienols and only ONE type of tocopherol.

    So, how do you get more of the heart healthy vitamin E that contains tocotrienols?

    You can find high concentrations of tocotrienols in certain oils. Annatto, palm, and rice bran oil are good sources. You should be able to find them at your local health food store, specialty grocery store, or online at www.AmericanNutrition.com.

    Keep Your Heart Healthy with Fish Oil & Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    October 14, 2009

    The American Heart Association Recommends Omega-3 fatty acids an fish oil supplements. Omega 3 contains Fish oil which can benefit the heart of healthy people, and those at high risk of  or already have  cardiovascular disease.

    You should be eating fish (particularly fatty fish) at least two times a week
    Fish is a great source of protein and doesn’t have the high saturated fat that meat products do.  Fatty fish like mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna and salmon are high in two kinds of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

    Dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids include fish oil and certain plant and nut oils. Fish oil contains both docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), while some nuts (English walnuts) and vegetable oils (canola, soybean, flaxseed/linseed, olive) contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA).

    There is evidence from multiple studies supporting intake of recommended amounts of DHA and EPA in the form of dietary fish or fish oil supplements lowers triglycerides, reduces the risk of death, heart attack, dangerous abnormal heart rhythms, and strokes in people with known cardiovascular disease. It also slows the buildup of atherosclerotic plaques (“hardening of the arteries”), and lowers blood pressure slightly.

    *Some species of fish carry a higher risk of environmental contamination, such as with methyl mercury. So make sure the source of your supplementation is a trusted one like American Nutrition.

    American Nutrition Fish Oil is guaranteed to comply with strict European standards for heavy metals, PCBs, dioxins, pesticides and other unwanted compounds.

    Click here to learn more about Omega 3’s & Fish Oil Supplementation…

    Deal of the Day: Resveratrol

    July 17, 2009

    NRx_Resveratrol_Bulk_Powder-100g
    Resveratrol

    Bulk Powder 100 g
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    (Retail: $59.90)
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    Resveratrol is a natural substance found in grapes and other plants to help ward off fungus infections. The Resveratrol content in wine varies tremendously. Grapes that have been sprayed with pesticides have less Resveratrol and grapes grown in humid climates have less Resveratrol. Organic red wines grown in humid climates are usually the wines with the highest Resveratrol content. Most red wines on the market contain little less than 1mg or no Resveratrol. The sure way to get the higher dosages of Resveratrol is the supplementation with nutritional supplements.

    DEAL OF THE DAY:
    Resveratrol

    ** Offer good until midnight, July 17 2009